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Showing posts from December, 2015

WHO says bacon causes cancer?

by Neha Pancholi

Note: Here at the PSPG blog, we like to feature writing from anyone in the Penn community interested in the science policy process or science for general interest. This is the 1st in a series of posts from new authors. Interested is writing for the blog? Contact us!

The daily meat consumption in the United States exceeds that of almost every other country1. While the majority of meat consumed in the United States is red meat2, the consumption of certain red meats has decreased over the past few decades due to associated health concerns, such as heart disease and diabetes1,2. In October, the World Health Organization (WHO) highlighted another potential health concern for red meat: cancer.
The announcement concerned both red and processed meat. Red meat is defined as unprocessed muscle meat from mammals, such as beef and pork3. Processed meat– generally red meat –has been altered to improve flavor through processes such as curing or smoking3. Examples of processed meat …

Ready to Adapt: Experts Discuss Philadelphia Epidemic Preparedness

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by Jamie DeNizio and Hannah Shoenhard

In early November, public health experts from a variety of organizations gathered on Penn’s campus to discuss Philadelphia’s communication strategies and preparation efforts in the event of an epidemic outbreak. In light of recent crises, such as H1N1 and Ebola in the US, AAAS Emerging Leaders in Science and Society (ELISS) fellows and the Penn Science Policy Group (PSPG) hosted local experts at both a public panel discussion and a focus group meeting to understand the systems currently in place and develop ideas about what more can be done. Are we prepared?: Communication with the public Dr. Max King, moderator of the public forum, set the tone for both events with a Benjamin Franklin quote: “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.” Measures taken before a crisis begins can make or break the success of a public health response. In particular, in the age of the sensationalized, 24-hour news cycle, the only way for public health professional…